Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
% american. his anger growing up was the catholic church. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is a kind of local royalty. everybody knew his mother's family and his father's family. his father was a prominent politician and very well respected, very well admired. a very successful businessman. joseph kennedy went to boston. he was a star. he met with the prettiest girl in boston who also happen to be the mayor's daughter. she would later marry. there is a story of the baseball team, he was class president when he went to harvard, and again, he felt part of the community. half of his class when with him to harvard and it was only when he graduated in 1912 that he understood, for the first time and not for the last what it meant to be the irish catholic son of an east boston politician. he wanted to go into banking and finance. he didn't do the job. he didn't get a job offer. he didn't get an interview. all of his friends and classmates, some of who were not as good with numbers as he was, none of who were as articulate or charming or handsome as he w
in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
's not my problem. seven news -- they take the news of the purchase back in the news arrives in boston so boston is the federalist territory. austin is the opposition that would surely want to deprive jefferson of any such tyamck and the way they signaled their opposition to the purchases they set off a fireworks display in celebration. this was not a controversial thing in american politics. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. the senate's starts to debate whether the ratification of the trade and treaty and the only obstacle arises is that jefferson himself gives strict instructions of the abuse of the power of government led him to play the federal government does not have the power to acquire territory. he starts to him and hans is needed constitutional amendment to give the government this power. napoleon who had overthrown -- >> host: and institutionalist. >> guest: not likely to be impressed and he starts making arguments. i will just revoke the treaty. it's not even ratified yet. madison comes to jefferson -- >> host: who is the secretary of state. >> guest: madison
schedule of live coverage of visit our web site at booktv.org. also this weekend is the 36 annual boston international book fair. the fair will feature dozens of exhibitors and display several firsts or special editions of classic novels and books. florida will host the 30 first annual key west literary seminar from january 10th through the 20th. readers can ventured to the festival to sit in on seminars or listen to several lawyers panels. discuss the foundations of writing and creativity. then in february, georgia will host the savannah book festival from the fourteenth to the seventeenth. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area and we will add them to the list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> this is a booktv live coverage of the 29th annual book fair, a full weekend of mar their panels, call ins and other events. here is the lineup for today. in just a minute dave barry, humor columnist will talk about his book lunatics. >> join be joined by will tracy of the onion, the onion book of no knowledge is their lates
the news of the purchase back. it arrived in boston. boston is federalist territory, the opposition for the jefferson administration. the opposition that would want to deprive jefferson of the triumphs, and how they signal the opposition to the purchase is set off a fireworks display. it was not a throaferl -- controversial thing. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty, and the only major obstacle to the purchase then arises is that jefferson, himself, strict views of the power of the federal government led him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire territory, and he starts to hem and haw and say what we need is a constitutional amendment to give the government this power. now, napolian in france overthrew his government. he was not likely would be impressed by the argument. he makes noises saying, look, i'll just revoke the treaty. it's not been ratified yet. madison, our baseline alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of s
arrives in boston and its federalist territory, the opposition for the administration. the opposition but surely wanted to deprive him from any such triumphed and the way they signaled their opposition as they set off a fireworks display. so this wasn't a controversy will thing in american politics. american politicians really enthusiastic about this. when we get to washington and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty and the only major obstacle but then arises is jefferson himself stripped construction and the federal government and led him to believe that the federal government didn't have the power to acquire territory. and he starts to say what we need in the government to give its power. now napoleon back in france is a man that had overthrown. he wasn't exactly likely to be -- >> host: institutionalized. >> guest: that is exactly right. he starts making noises saying i will just remote the treaty. it's not ratified yet. so then madison, an alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: that's right his closest friend, i
a bounty for indian scalps, went back, scalped them, and went to boston where she was a hero in. they erected a statue to her, the first statue of a woman showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scalp l in the other. >> kenneth davis, taking your questions, and the most recent, "don't know much about american presidents," watch live on booktv on c-span2. >> just a few minutes ago, i called vice president bush and congratlated him on his victory. i know i speak to you that he'll be our president, and we'll work with him. this nation faces major challenges ahead, and we must work together. >> i've just received a telephone call from governor decaucus. [cheers and applause] i want you to know that he was most gracious. his call was personal. it was genuinely friendly, and it was great tradition of american politics. .. >> if you're a registered voter, you have a choice to make this year. among three candidates on election day. the polls are accurate, every vote will matter. this race is considered a tossup too close to call. if you are undecided tonight come in the next hour may
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
staff certainly said one thing but in boston at the romney headquarters my god was sensing a lot of confidence coming out of that building. unlike mr. romney and did have a concession speech prepared for this event as we thought through what the conversation would be like depending on the scenario but i had a few questions on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2004, where we had a dozen constitutional amendments passed all across the country. you had karl rove celebrated as the architect hewitt just built a new kind of republican electoral majority that would have legs in traction for a decade or two. you had a president who was reelected, not because of that within the toolkit was the use of the wedge issue, gay, gays and lgbt couples across the country. the dark and sort of fetal position and what i sensed on election night this year is how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves up and we decided to fight and decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our great democratic front. a lot of movements co
on this gragraduate degree, he is workig at a domestic violence shelter in boston. harvard awarded him the thomas upton scholarship. pierre recently wrote an article about growing up as undocumented immigrant and here what is he said. "i am not a criminal, a monito , a predator, or swung had sits at someone doing nothing meaningful. i care for this country, as well as its sorrows and joys. i am not asking that our government maintain an open-door policy for immigrants. i am simply asking that it give an opportunity to those of us who have proven ourselves." well, pierre is right. america needs young people just like him who love their country and are dedicated to caring for our society's most vulnerable. so what do the american people think about the idea of the dream act? a bloomberg poll found that 64% of likely voters, almost two out of three, including 66% of independents support the policy compared to only 30% who oppose it. by a margin of 2-1 the american people know this is the right thing to do. now we need to pass a comprehensive immigration reform. on our side the negotiating effort wil
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13